Top 10 Coronavirus Questions and Stats
Top 10 Coronavirus Questions and Stats

10 Coronavirus questions you’re too afraid to ask

In December 2019, a new virus emerged in the Chinese city of Wuhan, causing a sometimes fatal epidemic that later became a global emergency.

COVID-19 renamed now as SARS-CoV-2 belongs to a family of viruses that can manifest through colds to acute respiratory syndromes such as SARS, a virus that broke out in Hong Kong and killed nearly 800 people between 2002 and 2003.

1. Why is the coronavirus so bad?

The virus has been described as “insidious” due to a large number of people who feel well enough to carry out their daily tasks, thus infecting other people. In just two months, the death toll exceeded that of the SARS epidemic.
COVID-19 Real Time Stats

At the beginning of February, the mortality rate was about 2%, significantly less than 10% for SARS. But the numbers cannot be certain until this point of the epidemic. According to Bloomberg, on March 7, 2020, there are close to 102,000 confirmed cases and 3,492 deaths since the beginning.

2. Will I die if I get infected?

Coronavirus (COVID-19) is most problematic if you are over 70, a smoker and already had heart and lung problems of some kind.

The higher death rate in men could be caused by higher smoking rates for men in China. Smoking increases the risks of respiratory complications.

Patients who reported no pre-existing (“comorbid”) medical conditions had a case fatality rate of 0.9%. Having heart, lung, and diabetes increases the rate of death by 7 to 12 times.

COVID19 (SARS-CoV-2) A breakdown of deaths by age
COVID19 (SARS-CoV-2) A breakdown of deaths by age
Coronavirus COVID-19 Death rate by sex
Coronavirus COVID-19 Death rate by sex
Coronavirus COVID-19 Death rate by pre-existing conditions
Coronavirus COVID-19 Death rate by pre-existing conditions

SOURCES – WorldOMeter Data is from the Epidemiological Characteristics of an Outbreak of 2019 Novel Coronavirus Diseases (COVID-19) – China CCDC, February 17 2020.

3. What countries are most exposed to coronavirus?

About 80% of cases and deaths are in China. But the death rate — the number of known deaths out of the total number of confirmed cases — varies widely by country right now. The second in place is now Italy with over 12000 confirmed cases of which 2313 have been discovered in the last 24 hours.

 Generally, the death rate seems to decrease as more people are tested and cases are confirmed. The death rate of a disease is different from its mortality rate — the latter is the number of deaths out of the number of people in an at-risk population. A death rate is not a reflection of the likelihood that any given person will die if infected.

Country Cases New Cases Deaths New Deaths Recovered
USA 309,728 32,567 8,441 1,037 14,741
Spain 126,168 6,969 11,947 749 34,219
Italy 124,632 4,805 15,362 681 20,996
Germany 96,092 4,933 1,444 169 26,400
France 89,953 7,788 7,560 1,053 15,438
China 81,639 0 3,326 0 76,755
Iran 55,743 2,560 3,452 158 19,736
UK 41,903 3,735 4,313 708 135
Turkey 23,934 3,013 501 76 786
Switzerland 20,505 899 666 75 6,415
Belgium 18,431 1,661 1,283 140 3,247
Netherlands 16,627 904 1,651 164 250
Canada 13,912 1,537 231 23 2,595
Austria 11,781 257 186 18 2,507
Portugal 10,524 638 266 20 75
Brazil 10,360 1,166 445 82 127
S. Korea 10,156 94 177 3 6,325
Israel 7,851 423 44 4 427
Sweden 6,443 312 373 15 205
Norway 5,550 180 62 3 32
Australia 5,550 96 30 2 585
Russia 4,731 582 43 9 333
Ireland 4,604 331 137 17 25
Czechia 4,472 282 59 6 78
Chile 4,161 424 27 5 528
Denmark 4,077 320 161 22 1,283
Poland 3,627 244 79 8 116
Romania 3,613 430 146 13 329
Malaysia 3,483 150 57 4 915
Ecuador 3,465 97 172 27 100
Japan 3,139 204 77 8 514
Philippines 3,094 76 144 8 57
India 3,082 23 86 0 229
Pakistan 2,818 132 41 1 131
Luxembourg 2,729 117 31 0 500
Saudi Arabia 2,179 140 29 4 420
Indonesia 2,092 106 191 10 150
Thailand 2,067 89 20 1 674
Finland 1,882 267 25 5 300
Peru 1,746 151 73 12 914
Mexico 1,688 178 60 10 633
Greece 1,673 60 68 5 78
Panama 1,673 0 41 0 13
Serbia 1,624 148 44 5 54
South Africa 1,585 80 9 0 95
Dominican Republic 1,578 90 77 9 17
UAE 1,505 241 10 1 125
Argentina 1,451 98 43 1 279
Iceland 1,417 53 4 0 396
Colombia 1,406 139 32 7 85
Qatar 1,325 250 3 0 109
Algeria 1,251 80 130 25 90
Ukraine 1,225 153 32 5 25
Singapore 1,189 75 6 1 297
Croatia 1,126 47 12 4 119
Egypt 1,070 85 71 5 241
Estonia 1,039 78 13 1 59
Slovenia 977 43 22 2 79
New Zealand 950 82 1 0 127
Morocco 919 128 59 11 66
Iraq 878 58 56 2 259
Hong Kong 862 17 4 0 173
Lithuania 771 75 11 2 7
Armenia 770 34 7 0 43
Moldova, Republic of 752 161 12 4 29
Diamond Princess 712 0 11 0 619
Bahrain 688 16 4 0 423
Hungary 678 55 32 6 58
Bosnia 624 45 21 4 30
Cameroon 555 46 9 1 17
Tunisia 553 58 18 0 5
Kazakhstan 531 67 5 2 36
Azerbaijan 521 78 5 0 32
Lebanon 520 12 17 0 54
Latvia 509 16 1 0 1
Bulgaria 503 18 17 3 34
Macedonia 483 53 17 5 20
Kuwait 479 62 1 1 93
Slovakia 471 21 1 0 10
Andorra 466 27 17 1 21
Belarus 440 89 5 1 53
Costa Rica 435 19 2 0 13
Cyprus 426 30 11 0 33
Uruguay 400 14 5 1 93
Taiwan 355 7 5 0 50
Réunion 334 13 0 0 40
Albania 333 29 20 3 99
Jordan 323 13 5 0 74
Burkina Faso 318 16 16 0 66
Afghanistan 299 18 7 1 10
Cuba 288 19 6 0 15
Oman 277 25 2 1 61
Uzbekistan 266 39 2 0 25
Honduras 264 42 15 0 3
Channel Islands 262 30 5 1 13
San Marino 259 8 32 0 27
Côte d'Ivoire 245 27 1 0 25
Vietnam 240 1 0 0 90
Senegal 219 12 2 1 72
Palestinian Territory, Occupied 217 23 1 0 21
Nigeria 214 4 4 0 25
Malta 213 11 0 0 2
Ghana 205 0 5 0 31
Montenegro 201 27 2 0 1
Mauritius 196 10 7 0 7
Faroe Islands 181 2 0 0 93
Sri Lanka 166 7 5 1 27
Georgia 162 7 1 1 36
Venezuela 155 2 7 0 52
DRC 154 6 18 2 3
Martinique 145 2 3 0 27
Niger 144 24 8 3 0
Kyrgyzstan 144 14 1 0 9
Bolivia 139 7 10 1 1
Brunei 135 1 1 0 66
Guadeloupe 134 4 7 0 24
Mayotte 134 6 2 0 14
Kenya 126 4 4 0 4
Isle of Man 126 12 1 0 0
Cambodia 114 0 0 0 50
Guinea 111 38 0 0 5
Trinidad and Tobago 103 5 6 0 1
Rwanda 102 13 0 0 0
Gibraltar 98 3 0 0 52
Paraguay 96 4 3 0 12
Liechtenstein 77 2 1 1 0
Bangladesh 70 9 8 2 30
Madagascar 70 0 0 0 0
Monaco 66 2 1 0 3
Aruba 64 2 0 0 1
Guatemala 61 11 2 1 15
French Guiana 61 4 0 0 22
El Salvador 56 10 3 0 2
Jamaica 53 0 3 0 7
Barbados 52 1 0 0 0
Djibouti 50 1 0 0 8
Uganda 48 0 0 0 0
Macao 44 2 0 0 10
Mali 41 2 3 0 1
Togo 41 1 3 0 17
French Polynesia 40 1 0 0 0
Zambia 39 0 1 0 2
Ethiopia 38 3 0 0 4
Cayman Islands 35 6 1 0 1
Bermuda 35 0 0 0 14
Eritrea 29 7 0 0 0
Bahamas 28 4 4 1 0
Saint Martin 24 2 2 1 5
Guyana 23 0 4 0 0
Sint Maarten 23 0 4 0 6
Congo 22 0 2 0 2
Gabon 21 0 1 0 1
Myanmar 21 1 1 0 0
Tanzania, United Republic of 20 0 1 0 3
Haiti 20 2 0 0 1
Maldives 19 0 0 0 13
Libyan Arab Jamahiriya 18 1 1 0 0
Guinea-Bissau 18 3 0 0 0
New Caledonia 17 0 0 0 1
Syrian Arab Republic 16 0 2 0 2
Benin 16 0 0 0 2
Equatorial Guinea 16 0 0 0 1
Antigua and Barbuda 15 0 0 0 0
Dominica 14 0 0 0 0
Mongolia 14 0 0 0 2
Namibia 14 0 0 0 3
Saint Lucia 14 1 0 0 1
Fiji 12 5 0 0 0
Grenada 12 0 0 0 0
Curaçao 11 0 1 0 5
Greenland 11 1 0 0 3
Angola 10 2 2 0 2
Sudan 10 0 2 0 2
Liberia 10 3 1 1 3
Suriname 10 0 1 0 0
Lao People's Democratic Republic 10 0 0 0 0
Mozambique 10 0 0 0 1
Seychelles 10 0 0 0 0
MS Zaandam 9 0 2 0 0
Zimbabwe 9 0 1 0 0
Nepal 9 3 0 0 1
Chad 9 1 0 0 0
Saint Kitts and Nevis 9 0 0 0 0
Swaziland 9 0 0 0 0
Central African Republic 8 0 0 0 0
Cabo Verde 7 1 1 0 0
Holy See (Vatican City State) 7 0 0 0 0
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 7 0 0 0 1
Somalia 7 0 0 0 1
Mauritania 6 0 1 0 2
Montserrat 6 0 0 0 0
St. Barth 6 0 0 0 1
Nicaragua 5 0 1 0 0
Bhutan 5 0 0 0 2
Turks and Caicos Islands 5 0 0 0 0
Botswana 4 0 1 0 0
Gambia 4 0 1 0 2
Belize 4 0 0 0 0
Malawi 4 1 0 0 0
Sierra Leone 4 2 0 0 0
Anguilla 3 0 0 0 0
British Virgin Islands 3 0 0 0 0
Burundi 3 0 0 0 0
Caribbean Netherlands 2 0 0 0 0
Falkland Islands (Malvinas) 1 0 0 0 0
Papua New Guinea 1 0 0 0 0
Timor-Leste 1 0 0 0 0

Source: Worldometers

While this variation between countries may sound concerning, the rate strongly depends on how many people get tested for the virus. In countries like South Korea and China, which have tested hundreds of thousands of people, the death rate is lower than in, say, the US, which has tested less than 2,000.

4. How does it compare to other epidemics?

From a genetic point of view, it is similar to SARS, but it seems to be milder in terms of symptoms and mortality. Another related virus, MERS-CoV, which was born in 2012, has killed 34% of the 2,499 reported cases. By comparison, 50 million people died in the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic that infected almost a third of the world’s population.

How COVID-19 compares to past epidemics
How COVID-19 compares to past epidemics

Source: NBCNews.com

COVID-19 vs SARS vs MERS - A breakdown of deaths by age
COVID-19 vs SARS vs MERS – A breakdown of deaths by age

Source: NBCNews.com

5. How does it spread?

Most likely, through the almost invisible drops a person emits when talking, coughing and breathing, they can be transmitted directly to people in the immediate vicinity by touching their hands or other surfaces.

There is a risk, until now only at the theoretical level, according to which the virus can be transmitted by faeces or by small particles – aerosols. In addition, people who have not had any symptoms can spread the disease.

6. How contagious is it?

Epidemiologists are trying to define the potential for contagion by estimating the number of people that can be infected by a person. The measurement is only an indicator that represents the high degree of control of an epidemic.

The World Health Organization has published a number between 1.4 and 2.5 for COVID-19, while a group from the Chinese Academy of Sciences has published a potential number of 4.08 potential people infested by a single man.

7. Why is it called coronavirus?

The coronaviruses are named after the crown shape they have. There is a whole family. The World Health Organization has said that several variants of the virus occur periodically throughout the globe, with several versions already circulating in animals without infesting humans.

COVID-19 Corona-Virus Structure
COVID-19 Corona-Virus Structure

Source: MedScape

Coronaviruses tend to transform and evolve, which means that the level of risk they possess can change as they continue to flow from person to person.

8. What is he doing?

Infections appear to cause minor and severe conditions in children, adolescents and young adults, and more severe in the elderly. The first signs are fever, dry cough and fatigue and do not initially manifest as a classic cold.

In severe cases, studies suggest that the virus invades the cells, causing respiratory distress and inflammatory conditions and congestion associated with pneumonia.

Just over half of the patients developed acute respiratory syndrome. In addition, a large number of deaths have been reported for patients with cardiovascular disease.

9. How serious can a new virus be?

There will always be fears when a new pathogen is born in humans because, for the most part, people’s immunity is quite low and there are usually no specific treatments or vaccines.

The new coronaviruses, previously unheard of in humans, are a serious cause for concern because they were not known to trigger complicated epidemics that sicken thousands of people.

10. What do the authorities do?

The Chinese government has declared quarantine in Wuhan and more than 10 cities in the region, with travel restrictions affecting nearly 50 million people.

New hospitals were built in just a few days, accelerating the production of medical equipment. The World Health Organization has declared a state of global emergency, a movement that seeks international mobilization.

Several people accused of having transmitted false information about the epidemic are being charged in several Asian countries. Hong Kong, China’s financial centre, has announced a series of restrictions on travel to mainland China.

The United States, Australia and India have stopped access to non-citizens coming from China, even though the World Health Organization has called these measures “unnecessary”.

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